Transport to place of work or study of people in a household

Mnemonic reference (code): WSTRHS11

Note: This variable is also listed under the title 'Method of travel to place of work or study of people in a household'

Type: Derived variable

Definition: This variable provides a count of the number of people working or studying in a household with the method of travel used for the longest part, by distance, of their usual journey to work or place of study.

Applicability: Household

Classification:

Language proficiency, spoken English

Mnemonic (reference code): LANGPRF

Note: This variable is also listed under the titles 'Proficiency in spoken English' and 'English language proficiency, spoken'

Type: Primary variable

Definition: LANGPRF refers to how proficient people are in spoken English. People are asked to self-assess how well they can speak English and choose from the options 'Very well', 'Well', 'Not well' and 'Not at all'.

Applicability: Person

Classification:

Proficiency in spoken English

Mnemonic (reference code): LANGPRF

Note: This variable is also listed under the titles 'English language proficiency, spoken' and 'Language proficiency, spoken English'

Type: Primary variable

Definition: LANGPRF refers to how proficient people are in spoken English. People are asked to self-assess how well they can speak English and choose from the options 'Very well', 'Well', 'Not well' and 'Not at all'.

Applicability: Person

Classification:

Year last worked

Mnemonic reference (code): UNEMPHISTPS11

Note: This variable is also shown under the title 'Unemployment History'

Type: Derived variable

Definition: Unemployment history defines the year that a person last worked. People in full-time and part-time employment are not counted in this variable.

Applicability: Person

Classification:

Scotland's Census 2011 Microdata published

National Records of Scotland have published a variety of microdata products from the 2011 census. Microdata are small samples of data for whole households and individuals, which include some associated census characteristics but no information that could identify a household or individual. Microdata products enable researchers to look at combinations of characteristics that are not generally available from the standard census tables, and to perform different types of analyses not possible from standard tabulations.

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